FLUTE

Wooden Flutes
Care & Feeding
Anatomy
Pictoral History
Olwell Flutes

NAVIGATE

Celtic Cove
Vintage Music

Vintage Chronical
Instrument Tour

Caring for the Wooden Flute

Steps to a Long Lived Flute

Introduction Rules to Live By (summary?)

Purchasing Hints Get the Right One

Terminology The Doodads and Thingamajigs

Humidity Moisture Content Change Control

Brand New Breaking in a New Flute

Playing Routine A Little Every Day

Care Cleaning &Oiling

Hygiene It really matters

Storage & Transport Doing It Right All the Time

Something Gone Wrong? Stop if something feels wrong

Tools & Supplies Get the Right Stuff  (Borescope?)

Preventative Maintenance Professional care ahead of time

Repairs Trust only the Best

Introduction

The Wooden Flute is a treasure, not a mere tool.  The same qualities that make it more expressive than a metal flute  also introduce a degree of fragility.  This means that it has to be taken care of in the right way.  Wooden flutes can survive more than a lifetime - if taken care of properly.

 An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

  There are no short cuts

 Still, it does not hurt to have a spare

Wooden flutes from quality makers are very reliable.  The same flute can stay with you throughout your lifetime and be ready to pass on to the next generation.

A Celtic Cove Publication

Copyright Celtic Cove.  All Rights Reserved.

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Guide to Care & Feeding of the Wooden Flute

Purchasing Hints

The safest route is to buy quality.  There are reasons why professional players stick to the same narrow tried and true.  They ahave learned what wroks under the stresses of playing on the road.  What are the hallmarks of a quality, long lasting product?

 High quality wood like Grenadilla (Cocus) with straight grain

  Ferrules at joints

 Block mounted keys

Flutes very similar to this type are still made today - by hightly skilled makers working by hand - in small shops. 

Terminology

For more details, see the anatomy of a flute.

FIRST SECTION:  Head

End Cap (Decorated with a small bead, done in  same wood as body)

Ferrule or Ring (silver) to lessen cracking

Plain Embouchure (opening for breath to enter)

Tuning Sleeve (silver)

SECOND SECTION:  Barrel

Tuning Sleeve, to allow mathing to desired pitch

Ring

THIRD SECTION:

Tenon (all cork lined)

Keys (all block mounted)

Tenon

FOURTH SECTION:

Ring

Keys

Tenon

FIFTH SECTION:  Foot

Ring at Socket

Keys

For more details, see the anatomy of a flute.

A Celtic Cove Publication

Copyright Celtic Cove.  All Rights Reserved.

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© Celtic Cove

 
 

All Rights Reserved

 
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